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Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Market Analysis- Industry Size, Share, Research Report, Insights, Covid-19 Impact, Statistics, Trends, Growth and Forecast 2022-2030

Published Date: December, 2022
No of Pages: 164
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Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Market
1) Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and global burden
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in working-age adults. The number of people affected by diabetic retinopathy is expected to increase from 415 million in 2015 to 622 million in 2040.

The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy is higher in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. In 2010, an estimated 4.8% of the world’s working-age population was affected by diabetic retinopathy. By 2040, this is expected to increase to 7.3%.

The global burden of diabetic retinopathy is expected to increase from 1.6 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2010 to 3.4 million DALYs in 2040. The number of deaths due to diabetic retinopathy is expected to increase from 233,000 in 2010 to 544,000 in 2040.

The economic cost of diabetic retinopathy is expected to increase from US$191 billion in 2010 to US$859 billion in 2040.

There is no cure for diabetic retinopathy. However, early detection and treatment can slow the progression of the disease and reduce the risk of blindness.

2) Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment among working-age adults. The National Eye Institute (NEI) estimates that diabetes affects more than 7 million Americans. Of these, more than 5 million have some form of DR.

There are two main types of DR: non-proliferative and proliferative. Non-proliferative DR (NPDR) is the early stage of the disease, when the retina is damaged but there is no vision loss. Proliferative DR (PDR) is the advanced stage, when new blood vessels grow on the retina and leak blood into the eye, causing vision loss.

There are several risk factors for DR, including:

1) Poorly controlled blood sugar levels: High blood sugar levels can damage the blood vessels in the retina.

2) High blood pressure: High blood pressure can damage the blood vessels in the retina.

3) Obesity: Obesity can increase the risk of diabetes and high blood pressure, both of which can damage the blood vessels in the retina.

4) Smoking: Smoking can damage the blood vessels in the retina.

5) Family history: People with a family history of diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease themselves.

6) Age: The risk of DR increases with age.

People with diabetes should have a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year to check for DR. Early detection and treatment of DR can help prevent vision loss.

3) Pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. It can cause blindness if left untreated. The retina is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when the blood vessels in the retina become damaged. This can happen if you have diabetes for a long time.

The early stage of diabetic retinopathy is called non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). At this stage, the blood vessels in the retina become damaged and leaky. This can cause the retina to swell.

The later stage of diabetic retinopathy is called proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). At this stage, new blood vessels grow on the retina. These new blood vessels are fragile and can bleed. This can cause vision loss.

Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with laser surgery. This can stop the progression of the disease and save your vision.

4) Treatment options for diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that damages the blood vessels in the retina, the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of the eye. It’s the leading cause of blindness in people with diabetes.

There are four main treatment options for diabetic retinopathy:

1. Laser surgery

Laser surgery, also called photocoagulation, is the most common treatment for diabetic retinopathy. It involves using a laser to destroy abnormal blood vessels in the eye.

2. Injections

Injections of drugs into the eye are another treatment option for diabetic retinopathy. These drugs, called anti-VEGF drugs, help to stop the growth of new blood vessels.

3. Surgery

Surgery is an option for people with severe diabetic retinopathy. There are two types of surgery that can be done:

• Vitrectomy: This surgery involves removing the blood from the eye.

• Retinal detachment surgery: This surgery involves reattaching the retina to the back of the eye.

4. Laser surgery

Laser surgery is the most common treatment for diabetic retinopathy. It involves using a laser to destroy abnormal blood vessels in the eye.

5. Injections

Injections of drugs into the eye are another treatment option for diabetic retinopathy. These drugs, called anti-VEGF drugs, help to stop the growth of new blood vessels.

6. Surgery

Surgery is an option for people with severe diabetic retinopathy. There are two types of surgery that can be done:

• Vitrectomy: This surgery involves removing the blood from the eye.

• Retinal detachment surgery: This surgery involves reattaching the retina to the back of the eye.

5) Clinical trials evaluating new treatments for diabetic retinopathy
The diabetic retinopathy treatment market is growing rapidly as the prevalence of diabetes increases globally. There are many clinical trials evaluating new treatments for diabetic retinopathy. Here are five of the most promising new treatments:

1. Intravitreal injections of ranibizumab (Lucentis) are effective in treating diabetic macular edema, the leading cause of vision loss in diabetes. In one study, patients who received ranibizumab injections every four weeks for two years had significant improvements in visual acuity and macular thickness, compared to those who received sham injections.

2. Bevacizumab (Avastin) is another anti-VEGF drug that has shown promise in treating diabetic macular edema. In one study, patients who received bevacizumab injections every four weeks for two years had significant improvements in visual acuity and macular thickness, compared to those who received sham injections.

3. Dexamethasone intravitreal implants (Ozurdex) are effective in treating diabetic macular edema. In one study, patients who received dexamethasone implants every six months for two years had significant improvements in visual acuity and macular thickness, compared to those who received sham implants.

4. Intravitreal injections of aflibercept (Eylea) are effective in treating diabetic macular edema. In one study, patients who received aflibercept injections every four weeks for two years had significant improvements in visual acuity and macular thickness, compared to those who received sham injections.

5. Photodynamic therapy with verteporfin (Visudyne) is effective in treating diabetic macular edema. In one study, patients who received photodynamic therapy every six months for two years had significant improvements in visual acuity and macular thickness, compared to those who received sham therapy.

These new treatments are promising for patients with diabetic retinopathy. If you have diabetic retinopathy, talk to your doctor about these new treatment options.

6) Future directions in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy
The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is increasing worldwide due to the rising number of people with diabetes. DR is a leading cause of blindness and visual impairment, and its management is a major challenge for healthcare systems. There is no cure for DR, but early detection and treatment can prevent or delay its progression.

The current standard of care for DR is regular screening with eye exams and dilated fundus photography. If DR is detected, patients are typically treated with laser surgery, which can be effective in slowing the progression of the disease. However, laser surgery is not always successful, and it is associated with a risk of vision loss.

There is an urgent need for new and better treatments for DR. Here are six future directions in the treatment of DR:

1. Artificial intelligence (AI) in DR screening and diagnosis

AI is being used in a variety of medical applications, and it has the potential to transform DR screening and diagnosis. AI-based systems can be trained to detect DR faster and more accurately than traditional methods. They can also be used to predict a patient’s risk of progression and tailor treatment accordingly.

2. New and improved drugs for DR

There are several drugs in development that show promise for the treatment of DR. These include anti-VEGF drugs, which are designed to block the growth of new blood vessels, and stellate ganglion blockades, which are thought to reduce inflammation and improve blood flow to the retina.

3. Gene therapy for DR

Gene therapy is a promising new approach for the treatment of DR. In gene therapy, a healthy copy of a gene is introduced into cells to replace a defective or missing gene. This can correct the underlying cause of the disease and potentially prevent or reverse its progression.

4. Stem cell therapy for DR

Stem cell therapy is another promising new approach for the treatment of DR. In stem cell therapy, healthy stem cells are injected into the eye to replace damaged or lost cells. This can potentially restore vision and prevent or reverse the progression of DR.

5. Nanotechnology in DR

Nanotechnology is being used in a variety of medical applications,

Key Players Covered

Some of the major companies that are present in the global diabetic retinopathy treatment market are F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Alimera Sciences, Abbott, Novartis AG, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Pfizer Inc., Bayer AG, and Oxurion NV, and others.

SEGMENTATION

 

SEGMENTATION

 

 DETAILS
 

By Diabetic Retinopathy Type

 

 

· Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

· Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

 

By Treatment Type

 

 

· Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Drug

· Laser Surgery

· Vitrectomy

· Intraocular Steroid Injection

 

By End User

 

 

· Hospitals

· Ophthalmic Centres

· Ambulatory Surgery Centres

· Others

 

By Geography

 

 

· North America (USA and Canada)

· Europe (UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and Rest of Europe)

· Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Australia, Southeast Asia and Rest of Asia Pacific)

· Latin America (Brazil, Mexico and Rest of Latin America)

· Middle East & Africa (South Africa, GCC and Rest of Middle East & Africa)

 

 

By Diabetic Retinopathy Type

 

 

· Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

· Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

 

By Treatment Type

 

 

· Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Drug

· Laser Surgery

· Vitrectomy

· Intraocular Steroid Injection

 

By End User

 

 

· Hospitals

· Ophthalmic Centres

· Ambulatory Surgery Centres

· Others

F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Alimera Sciences, Abbott, Novartis AG, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Pfizer Inc., Bayer AG, and Oxurion NV, and others.

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